Interview: Alex Storm Hague

Image from a photographic series by Alex Storm Hague discussing the link between latex and sexuality.
Image from a photographic series by Alex Storm Hague discussing the link between latex and sexuality.
Image from a photographic series by Alex Storm Hague discussing the link between latex and sexuality.
Image from a photographic series by Alex Storm Hague discussing the link between latex and sexuality.
Image from a photographic series by Alex Storm Hague discussing the link between latex and sexuality.

Artist Alex Storm Hague on her art, perceptions of beauty, feminism and being a bitch.

What inspired this series of images?

The photographs you see happened quite early on in my investigation as I was already aware of the connections between latex as a material and sexuality. I deliberately used pink to show a softer more feminine form which hopefully makes the images more approachable. I feel that pink is synonymous with femininity but I could easily visualise custom shades to represent a broader variety of skin tones rather than only intimating gender (which could be another project in itself). I’m also interested in art direction so focussing on female body parts with this in mind, particularly around how we are used to seeing the female form displayed in an objectified way and its expectations. (Trying to make the balloon conform to how I wanted it to look wasn’t lost on me in relation to this.)

 

What kind of reception have you had?

The main reaction has been positive, I’ve actually had no negative feedback and perhaps thats down to the way in which the images come across. I’ve left it open to interpretation and haven’t attached an agenda to them so for the time being they’ve remained unchallenged. Like I say, they came about early on in my work so they are by no means an end result but I’m happy that they symbolise an aspect of feminism.

 

Bitch. What does this word mean to you?

To me ‘bitch’ used to mean a girl/woman that was independent enough to stop at nothing to get what she wanted, she wasn’t bothered by peoples opinion, she was doing her own thing, she was straight forward and transparent even if that rubbed people the wrong way (expectation versus reality) – That’s the mentality I grew up with in the 90s, girl power n’ all that, perhaps being a ‘bitch’ was something that was embraced to an extent. I know its been a derogatory term from those that are threatened by a woman and want to bring her down. Nowadays I think there are much stronger elements of sex and oppression of gender tied to it and I’m surprised when rappers use it but are quick to defend their own daughters in respect of that. My feeling of how its used today doesn’t sit well by comparison.

 

Does feminism inspire your work?

Yeah definitely I’ve always admired female artists and designers that were trying to carve a career for themselves and be taken seriously, especially those from a period that everything was against them. For me feminism isn’t always present in my finished work but in the kind of work I undertake. I’ve always been told that I can be/do whatever I want to be/do and have truly believed that. For example, a few years ago I became an instrument maker which is predominately a male occupation, I thoroughly enjoyed it and never felt like I didn’t belong, it was such a supportive environment to work in without being seen as ‘the little lady’ so to speak.

 

What are your own ideals of feminism?

It would be great if we didn’t need feminism, that people were treated equally as a political, economic and societal standard, that would be my ideal.

 

You can find more of Alex’s work at www.alexstormhague.com or follow her instagram @alexstormhague